basketball traveling

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There is a lot of confusion surrounding the topic of traveling in basketball. What is allowed, and what isn’t? In this blog post, we will discuss the rules around traveling in basketball, and provide some examples to help clear things up.

What is traveling in basketball?

Yes, there’s nothing to take on a road trip to play other teams. The traveling that we’re describing takes place on basketball courts and it never helps if someone else has the need for it. Most basketball fans know the referee is calling the players “traveling”. Although it is rarely called by NBA teams because referees can get away with it, many players find it an occurrence in higher-level games.

What do you need to know?

About traveling in basketball is that you must dribble the ball while moving. You can take as many steps as you want with the ball, but once you stop dribbling, you have to pass or shoot the ball. If you take more than two steps without dribbling the ball, it’s called traveling.

Here are a few examples of traveling:

-Taking more than two steps without dribbling the ball

-Dribbling the ball, stopping, and then picking it up again

-Carrying the ball while you are running

-Double dribbling (dribbling the ball with both hands)

As you can see, there are a few different ways that you can travel while playing basketball. If you are unsure about whether or not you are traveling, it is always best to ask a referee or your coach.

How can I avoid travel violations?

The best way to avoid traveling violations is to be aware of the rules. Make sure that you are dribbling the ball while you are moving, and only taking two steps when you have stopped dribbling. If you are unsure about whether or not you are traveling, always ask a referee or your coach.

Traveling is a common violation in basketball, but it is also one of the easiest to avoid. By following the rules and being aware of your surroundings, you can make sure that you don’t travel while playing.

The Euro-Step

The Euro-step is a move that has been popularized in recent years by players like Manu Ginobili and Dwyane Wade. The move involves taking two steps while dribbling, then picking up the dribble and taking another step. This can be used to avoid defenders or to travel, so it is important to be aware of the rules before using this move.

The Euro-step is a legal move as long as you do not travel while doing it. When executed correctly, the Euro-step can be a great way to avoid defenders and get to the basket. However, if you take too many steps or pick up your dribble too early, it will be called travel.

Pivot Foot

Your pivot foot is the foot that you have planted on the ground when you catch the ball. You can switch your pivot foot, but you cannot lift it off of the ground while holding the ball. If you lift your pivot foot while holding the ball, it will be called travel.

Traveling and the NBA

In the NBA, traveling is called much less often than it is in lower levels of basketball. This is because the referees are more lenient with the rules, and they often allow players to take more than two steps without dribbling. However, there are still travel violations called in the NBA, and they can be costly for a team if they happen at a crucial moment in the game.

Overall, traveling is a common violation in basketball. It is important to be aware of the rules so that you can avoid committing this violation. If you are unsure about whether or not you are traveling, always ask a referee or your coach.

Other Illegal Movements and Traveling Situations

In addition to the examples of traveling listed above, there are a few other illegal movements that can be called traveling. These include:

-Dribbling the ball with both hands (double dribble)

-Picking up your dribble and then taking more than two steps

-Carrying the ball while you are running

-Lifting your pivot foot off of the ground while holding the ball

If you are unsure about whether or not you are traveling, it is always best to ask a referee or your coach. Traveling is a common violation in basketball, but it is also one of the easiest to avoid. By following the rules and being aware of your surroundings, you can make sure that you don’t travel while playing.

The Deceiving Euro Step

The Euro step can often be used to travel, as it can be difficult to tell whether or not the player has taken more than two steps. If you are dribbling the ball and take two steps, then pick up your dribble and take another step, it is considered traveling.

Here is an example of a player using the Euro step to travel: In this example, the player takes two steps while dribbling, then picks up his dribble and takes another step. This is a clear violation of the traveling rules, and it would be called if this happened in a game.

How to Avoid traveling the best way to avoid traveling is to be aware of the rules and be conscious of your surroundings. If you are dribbling the ball, be sure to not take more than two steps without dribbling again.

If you are unsure about whether or not you are traveling, always ask a referee or your coach. By following the rules and being aware of your surroundings, you can make sure that you don’t travel while playing.

Facts About Traveling

-Traveling is a common violation in basketball.

-You can avoid traveling by being aware of the rules and conscious of your surroundings.

-If you are unsure about whether or not you are traveling, always ask a referee or your coach.

By following these tips, you can make sure that you don’t travel while playing basketball. Traveling is a common violation, but it is also one of the easiest to avoid. By being aware of your surroundings and following the rules, you can make sure that you don’t commit this violation.

The Official Rule As Defined By The NBA

“The official rule as defined by the NBA states that a player cannot take more than two steps without dribbling the ball. If a player takes more than two steps without dribbling, it is called traveling.”

This is the official rule as defined by the NBA. As you can see, it is important to be aware of your surroundings and to know the rules in order to avoid traveling.

If you are unsure about whether or not you are traveling, always ask a referee or your coach. By following these tips, you can make sure that you don’t travel while playing basketball.

Illegal Moveme nts

That Are Often Mistaken For Traveling

-Pivoting: A player is allowed to pivot on either foot, but they cannot pick up their pivot foot and move it. If a player picks up their pivot foot and moves it, it is called traveling.

-The Euro Step: The Euro step can often be used to travel, as it can be difficult to tell whether or not the player has taken more than two steps. If you are dribbling the ball and take two steps, then pick up your dribble and take another step, it is considered traveling.

-Spinning: A player is allowed to spin with the ball, but they cannot travel while doing so.

Common illegal moves

That is often mistaken for traveling including pivoting, the Euro step, and spinning. It is important to be aware of these moves so that you can avoid committing a traveling violation.

There you have it! Everything you need to know about basketball traveling. Be sure to be aware of your surroundings and follow the rules in order to avoid this common violation.

Did you find this article helpful? Let us know in the comments below!

Starting a Dribble

Starting a dribble from anywhere on the court, except when

-The ball is being legally held by an opponent.

-The ball is in the air on a try for a goal.

-A teammate touches the ball while it is in contact with the floor while it is in his/her team’s backcourt.

-A player touches the floor in the frontcourt with both feet while holding the

ball.

You may not dribble a second time after you have stopped your first dribble and picked up the ball unless it touches someone else or something else. This is called “double dribbling.” It is also a violation to catch the ball and then start a dribble. You must bounce the ball before you can pick it up again and start dribbling.

Can I pivot after 2 steps?

You can, but if you do not release the ball before your feet touch the floor again, it is considered travel.

A lot of people think that as long as you take two steps and then pivot on the third step, it’s not considered travel. That is incorrect. As soon as your feet touch the floor after taking the two steps, you have to release the ball or it’s a travel.

So in short, yes you can pivot after taking two steps, but you must release the ball before your feet touch the floor again. If you don’t, it will be considered travel.

Lifting the pivot foot before releasing the ball to Dribble

You are not allowed to lift your pivot foot before releasing the ball to dribble again. If you do, it will be called travel.

Pivoting is when you plant your feet and then turn your body around without moving your feet. You are allowed to pivot on either foot, but you cannot pick up your pivot foot and move it. If you pick up your pivot foot and move it, it is called traveling.

There are a few common moves that are often mistaken for traveling. These include pivoting, the Euro step, and spinning. It is important to be aware of these moves so that you can avoid committing a traveling violation.

Taking more than two steps while moving

You are allowed to take as many steps as you want while you are holding the ball, but once you pick up your dribble, you can only take two steps before you have to either shoot, pass or dribble again.

Picking up your dribble and then taking more than two steps is considered traveling. If you pick up your dribble and take more than two steps, you have to release the ball or it will be called travel.

There you have it! Everything you need to know about basketball traveling. Be sure to be aware of your surroundings and follow the rules in order to avoid this common violation.

Which foot should be my pivot foot?

It doesn’t matter which foot is your pivot foot, as long as you keep it stationary while you are pivoting.

You can switch your pivot foot while you are dribbling, but once you pick up your dribble, you cannot switch your pivot foot. If you do, it will be called travel.

When should I release the ball while pivoting?

You should release the ball before your feet touch the floor again. If you do not, it will be considered travel.

Lifting The Pivot Foot Before Ball Passing or Shooting

You are not allowed to lift your pivot foot before releasing the ball to pass or shoot. If you do, it will be called travel.

Pivoting is when you plant your feet and then turn your body around without moving your feet. You are allowed to pivot on either foot, but you cannot pick up your pivot foot and move it. If you pick up your pivot foot and move it, it is called traveling.

There are a few common moves that are often mistaken for traveling. These include pivoting, the Euro step, and spinning. It is important to be aware of these moves so that you can avoid committing a traveling violation.

Jumping and Coming Back Down Before Release

You are not allowed to jump and come back down before releasing the ball to pass or shoot. If you do, it will be called travel.

Pivoting is when you plant your feet and then turn your body around without moving your feet. You are allowed to pivot on either foot, but you cannot pick up your pivot foot and move it. If you pick up your pivot foot and move it, it is called traveling.

Final words

There you have it! Everything you need to know about basketball traveling. Be sure to be aware of your surroundings and follow the rules in order to avoid this common violation.

With these tips in mind, you’ll be sure to avoid any potential travels and keep the ball moving in the game! Good luck.

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